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Rosewood Bangkok, a visually striking, ultra-luxury property on Ploenchit Road in Bangkok’s prime central business and retail district, will open 31 March 2019, marking the second Thailand property for Rosewood Hotels & Resorts® and the dazzling urban sister to Rosewood Phuket, opened in 2017. An amalgam of contemporary sophistication and Thai heritage, Rosewood Bangkok will bring to life the brand’s hallmark A Sense of Place® philosophy through architectural design and carefully curated décor, spa and dining experiences. Reservations are now being accepted with opening offers available at rosewoodhotels.com. The 30-story standalone property will help reshape the Bangkok skyline by occupying two connecting high-rise structures that create a modern tribute to the Thai spirit.  Its contemporary form is inspired by the wai -- the graceful Thai gesture of palms pressed together in greeting.  The hotel will be conveniently connected to the BTS Station amidst a luxury enclave of embassies, new office towers and upscale malls. The hotel is celebrating its upcoming opening by launching its official @rosewoodbangkok social media accounts on Facebook and Instagram.  The Facebook platform debuts on 19 February with the distinctive #WaiBangkok campaign showcasing the dynamism, creativity and style of the Thai capital.  Residents and travelers will be invited to share their own new perspectives of Bangkok inspired by Rosewood Bangkok’s entry to the city. “Rosewood Bangkok represents an exciting new expression of ultra-luxury hospitality in Bangkok,” says Thomas Harlander, the hotel’s managing director.  “It will be a symbol of the emergence of the country’s capital as a hub of creative style and design for the region. Rosewood’s A Sense of Place® philosophy will also be thoughtfully interpreted in modern yet authentically Thai fashion through the entire hotel, from its design to all its experiences -- we aim to provide a portal to all the many fascinating sides of this captivating capital and culture.” The “#WaiBangkok” campaign, 19 February to 31 May, will feature a photo series by distinguished photographers Tum Chanipol Kusolcharttum and Scott Woodward. Tum, better known as Rockkhound, is one of Thailand's best street photographers and will kickstart the campaign with his perspective of Bangkok’s dynamic charisma. Scott Woodward, a Canadian seasoned documentary photographer whose works are often seen on the glossy pages of National Geographic, Condé Nast Traveler and New York Times, will contribute a series of photos of Bangkok that illustrate why this City of Angels so attracts him. The visually stunning campaign will invite people to share a different and more contemporary side of Thailand’s capital and showcase their favorite hidden gems to illustrate “why” they love Bangkok. Participants will post their own fresh and compelling images of the city on Rosewood Bangkok’s official social media accounts using the hashtag #WaiBangkok and tagging Rosewood Bangkok’s Facebook or Instagram account @RosewoodBangkok.  The winner will receive a THB100,000 credit to spend at the hotel.   Introductory Offers to Rediscover Bangkok “Redefining Bangkok,” offers guests an opportunity to tailor their inaugural stay with a choice of a one-way airport transfer in a Rosewood Bangkok limousine, daily breakfast for two at Lakorn European Brasserie,

Built during the reign of King Rama V, Surawong Road is one of Bangkok’s most vibrant and historic business neighborhoods. Connecting to the first road ever built in Bangkok, The Charoen Krung Road, and also to the banks of the Chao Phraya River, Surawong Road is revered as the Creative District. Thanks to its heritage, classic architecture, contemporary designs and authentic local food, this road is a cultural yet contemporary tourist destination. Here are 9 highlights of this area that you should not miss.     The Neilson Hays Library the monument of love   Amid the bustling business district, is a quaint neoclassical building called The Neilson Hays Library. Established in 1920, the library is a monument of love, by Dr. Thomas Heywood Hays, the former Chief of the Royal Thai Navy Hospital and the first medical professor of Siriraj Hospital, in loving memory of his wife, Jennie Neilson, an avid reader, who devoted herself to library work until her last days. The elegant structure was designed by Mario Tamagno, an Italian architect, responsible for numerous landmarks around Bangkok such as the Ananda Samakhom Throne Hall, Hua Lamphong Train Station, Makkawan Rangsan Bridge, and Phayathai Palace. The construction was executed with the same meticulous approach as those used with the aforementioned landmarks, prompting the public to call it “a grand palace on a small scale”. The still functional library offers more than 20,000 books for keen booklovers, and a gallery and café that have played host for special events and functions. It was awarded the status of “Historic Landmark” by the Association of Siamese Architects in 1986.     Bangkok Folk Museum Bangkokians’ treasured history   Bangkok Folk Museum, also known as Bangkokian Museum, is originally home to Professor Waraporn Surawadee who donated to property to become a museum that offers an insight into the lifestyles of Bangkokians amid lush, green garden. Located in the heart of bustling Bang Rak District that is now filled with commercial buildings and skyscrapers, Bangkok Folk Museum is a rare sanctuary that is open to the public for free. Visitors can also learn about the history of the house as well as Bangkok from knowledgeable staff members who will show you around and share delightful and fun stories along the way. Bangkok Folk Museum offers an insight into the lifestyles of well-off Bangkokians during World War II and its aftermath (circa 1937 – 1957). The museum consists of three zones in three quarters with display many of the possessions of original family members in good condition as well as memorabilia from early Rattanakosin Era and art pieces.     Bangkok General Post Office Bangkok’s design hub   In 1885 Thailand joined the Universal Postal Union and used the former British Embassy of Charoen Krung as office, which was later known as Bangkok General Post Office. In 1940, the building went through a major renovation, led by Mew Jitsame Apaiwong and Phraya Sarote Rattaniman. Under the brutalist concept that tends to use geometric shapes and showcase original surface of the materials, Bangkok General Post Office looks like a giant box paved

AccorHotels is proud to announce the first Orient Express hotel will open in the landmark King Power Mahanakhon Building in Bangkok. Imprinted in both history and imagination, the Orient Express brand has been reinvented for the future, with a vision to build a collection of prestigious hotels, steeped in tradition, myth and adventure. Sebastien Bazin, Chairman and CEO of AccorHotels said: “Orient Express has always acted as a passport between worlds and a trip on these legendary trains was historical, touristic and cinematic with an inimitable experience. This linking of Occident and Orient, of history and modernity, and of curiosity and cultures will be a hallmark of the new Orient Express Hotels and we are excited to bring back this spirit of luxurious adventure to today’s modern travellers.” Aiyawatt Srivaddhanaprabha Chief Executive Officer of King Power Group said, “The launch of the world’s first Orient Express Hotel at King Power Mahanakhon truly completes our vision of creating an extraordinary landmark that celebrates the city and adds a new milestone to Thailand and the world’s hospitality industry, while further elevating Thailand to a truly world-class destination. “King Power Mahanakhon seeks for all of its projects to be different, impressive and distinct, exuding excellence in every dimension. We look forward to welcoming visitors from all over the world, and placing Thailand’s tourism scene on the global stage through a landmark that combines exceptional hospitality, award-winning cuisine, a unique shopping experience and Bangkok’s spectacular views.” “We are proud to bring the multicultural heritage, mystery and exoticism of the legendary Orient Express brand to Bangkok” said Michael Issenberg, Chairman and CEO AccorHotels Asia Pacific. “Orient Express redefined rail travel in the 1900s, introducing the first sleeper cars linking West to East and delivering unprecedented levels of comfort and dining. We look forward to bringing this same luxury and refinement to the new incarnation of Orient Express hotels.” The original Orient Express trains were famous for the highest standards of fine craftsmanship, the newest innovations and the most exquisite dining and so Orient Express Mahanakhon Bangkok will bring together the best names in these fields to reinterpret the art of luxury travel. Esteemed designer Tristan Auer has been tasked with reimagining the Art Deco stylings and plant motifs of the original Orient Express carriages into a modern skyscraper in the heart of a bustling metropolis. The sumptuous bedrooms and exquisite bathrooms will bring new levels of style and luxury to Bangkok. Two signature restaurants will include Mott 32 on level 2 and Mahanathi by David Thompson on level 5 of the hotel. David Thompson is known worldwide for his skills and expertise in Thai cuisine and culinary. Thompson has established award-winning restaurants across the world, Nahm in London and Bangkok, Long Chim in Asia and Australia and Aaharn in Hong Kong. Famed Mott 32, will also bring an exceptional modern Cantonese dining experience to the city with a contemporary restaurant and cocktail bar in Orient Express Mahanakhon Bangkok. Mott 32 is named after 32 Mott Street in New York - the site

Hidden in the small corner left bank of Chao Phraya River, Chiang Mai Street, this rubicund, Victorian gingerbread-building is a true gem, so extremely tranquil and scenic that you could easily relax and breathe in the pleasure when you visit hectic Bangkok. This 10-room boutique hotel can be a trick to find but it is snuggled adjacent to thehip Heritage Community Lhong 1919, another must-see when you’re in the city.