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Latest Airbnb booking data has revealed growing interest in lesser-known destinations and eco-conscious cities across the globe, as travellers look for new, local and authentic travel experiences beyond big cities. In Thailand, emerging destinations across the country are increasingly appealing to both domestic and international travellers. Case-in-point is Buriram in Thailand’s Northeast saw 383% growth in bookings* year-over-year, propelling it into third place on Airbnb’s top 20 global destinations to visit next year. Here are the Top 20 trending destinations for 2020: 1. Milwaukee, WI, US The host of next year’s Democratic National Convention, Milwaukee makes it to the top of our trending list. This historic gem on the shores of Lake Michigan often slips under the radar but has a terrific bar and restaurant scene and fascinating cultural attractions that include a Calatrava-designed art museum. And with over 105 miles of scenic bike lanes, it’s easy to see why Milwaukee is experiencing an upsurge in interest among guests on Airbnb. 2. Bilbao, Spain Bilbao’s transformation from rust belt city to flourishing culture hub is truly remarkable. The city’s Frank Gehry-designed Guggenheim Museum put Bilbao on the map when it opened back in 1997. Since then the Basque city has been on an ever upward ascent, winning the European City of the Year in 2018. Visitors to the area are rewarded with a lively dining scene, breathtaking architecture and an unforgettable cityscape. Next year, Bilbao will also become a top destination for sports fans: it’s one of the host cities of Europe’s most beloved soccer competition. 3. Buriram, Thailand The rural province of Buriram is home to some of Thailand’s most treasured Khmer relics. Its best known monument is the incredible Phanom Rung complex which is comparable in grandeur to its much more famous Cambodian neighbor, Angkor Wat. In addition to ancient ruins, the province has also become a sporting hotspot: 2018 saw the inaugural MotoGP motor racing event at the Chang International Circuit which also plays host to the Buriram Marathon each year. MotoGP is scheduled to return in March next year. 4. Sunbury, Victoria, Australia A short drive northwest of Melbourne, the suburb of Sunbury is a popular spot with savvy locals thanks to its wildlife, wineries and Victorian-era architecture. Its biggest claim to fame is as the birthplace of cricket’s most sought-after trophy — The Ashes. In 2020, Sunbury looks to attract cricket fans from near and far as Melbourne will be hosting the ICC T20 World Cup. 5. Romania Romania, with its pristine hills and ancient rural villages, is the perfect destination for anyone looking for something off-the-beaten-track. The country has some of the best preserved virgin forests in Europe and, according to the 2018 Environmental Performance Index, ranks 15th globally when it comes to ecosystem vitality. 6. Xi'an, China Often cited as one of the birthplaces of Chinese civilization, Xi'an is best known as the home of the terracotta warriors — a vast collection of prehistoric clay soldiers discovered by local farmers in 1974. Today, the capital of China’s western Shaanxi province is a major culinary melting pot while

Eating is a significant part of any travel experience, and whether it’s enjoying a lamb and pear tajine in Morocco, some spicy jerk chicken in Jamaica or a selection of tapas in Spain, there’s nothing better than savouring a dish in its country of origin, plus it’s a great way to meet the locals. MOROCCAN It is said that in order for a nation to develop a great cuisine, it must have four prerequisites. A rich land from which to draw upon an abundant range of ingredients, a variety of foreign cultural influences, a great civilisation and lastly, a refined palace with royal kitchens to inspire the nation’s cooks. Morocco has it all, and is home to some of the most delicious food imaginable. From robust roasts to rich aromatic stews, spiced or sweetened salads to savoury pastries, fragrant mounds of couscous to bastilla, an exquisite blend of shredded pigeon, a spiced onion sauce with saffron and herbs encased in a flaky, filo-like pastry topped with cinnamon and sugar – an intricate dish that epitomises everything that is grand and extravagant in Moroccan cooking. One of the most interesting ways to absorb the delights of Moroccan cuisine is to wander through the souks (markets) of the towns and cities, sampling the food on offer. It’s early morning in old Fés and sunlight streams in slanted rays through the woven bamboo shades covering the narrow alleyways, catching the steam rising from the many cookers. Close to the city gate of Bab Bou Jaloud, one stallholder is busy cooking and serving a typical Moroccan breakfast, miklee – flaky pancakes with butter and honey. In a nearby fruit and vegetable souk, produce of every kind lines the street – juicy oranges from the sun-drenched groves of Agadir, vine-ripened tomatoes, plump mounds of grapes and preserved fruits and nuts. Entire shops are jam-packed with olives of all types; others display hanging baskets bulging with fresh mint, used to make mint tea that is traditionally served before and after a meal. At a spice souk, bright red paprika, rich yellow turmeric, dusty sticks of cinnamon, seeds of cumin, aniseed and caraway are heaped in tubs waiting to be measured into twisted envelopes of paper. These are some of the spices that form the soul of Moroccan cooking, transforming simple dishes to exotic heights. One of Morocco’s most famous dishes is the tajine or tagine. The name refers to the conical-lidded pot in which it is prepared, as well as the intricately spiced stew of meat and vegetables, sometimes with dried fruits and nuts, cooked very slowly over a charcoal fire. Typical tajine combinations include: lamb with pears and chicken with green olives and preserved lemons – simple yet delicious dishes that are often accompanied by thick wedges of crusty Moroccan flat bread, perfect for soaking up the sauce. JAMAICAN From fiery seasoned meat and inventive seafood dishes to oak-aged rums and hearty stouts, Jamaican cuisine is an eclectic mix of African, European and Indian influences – and is surprisingly healthy and varied. Although many

Located in Tsavo West National Park, the Kenya’s fist, oldest and largest National Park, Finch Hattons Luxury Tented Camp is set around natural fresh water springs within 35 acres (20,333 sq.km.) of pure untouched wilderness and surrounded by views of Mt. Kilimanjaro and the magnificent Chyulu Hills that is the home of more than 12,000 animal species. Originally opened in 1993 and just had a complete re-build of the entire camp and re-opened in 2015, this luxury tented camp was named ‘Best New Safari Camp by Architectural Digest’ in 2015 and voted as ‘Africa’s Leading Tented Safari Camp’ at the World Travel Awards in 2016. Award Winning Tented Suites Designed to be minimally intrusive, the camp’s 17 luxury suites offer sweeping views of the surrounding landscape, as well as total privacy for guests. The tents’ open-plan design invites the cool breeze that drifts over the nearby natural springs, and brings the sounds and scents of the African bush directly to you. The result is a one-on-one experience with Africa; this is the bush in all of its immediate and unapologetic beauty. The interior design of the tents is reminiscent of the golden days of African safaris. The suites feature indoor and outdo or showers, copper bathtubs, creamy white linen, gentle lighting, beautiful hardwood writing tables, intricate chandeliers, ornately carved chests, vintage carpets, and all the conveniences you would expect of a first-class offering. The People Finch Hattons is run by a passionate and experienced Kenyan team, about 60% of whom have been with the camp for over 15 years and about 40% since the very beginning. The original group joined as construction workers in 1993 and were trained on site. Many of the others contributed to the camp’s massive renovation in 2013. In very symbolic ways, this camp is theirs – they helped to build it from the ground up. Setting the standard in luxury camps, Finch Hattons hospitality has become synonymous with fine dining, exemplary service and outstanding safaris.   The Wildlife There are many animals that can be seen right from the comfort of your tent or the camp’s many viewing decks, including hippos, crocodiles, terrapins and baboons. Move a little beyond the camp and you’re likely to see Tsavo’s famous red elephants, as well as lions, leopards, buffalos, hartebeest, zebra, giraffe, oryx, bushbuck, waterbuck and lesser kudu (unique to Tsavo). Tsavo is also home to 500 different species of birds, 260 of which have been spotted in our camp. Things to Do There’s no shortage of activities to keep you busy while you’re at Finch Hattons. Day and night game drives, bush walks, full-day hikes and outings to the Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, Mzima Springs, Chyulu Hills, Amboseli National Park and Lake Jipe are all on offer. A cultural visit to the Maasai town of Iltilal can also be arranged, where you can observe the traditions of the Maasai people first-hand. If you choose to stay in camp, you can relax on one of their many viewing decks, watch their resident hippos and crocodiles wallow in the nearby springs, or